Scooter

breed: 1997 chestnut Arab gelding
registered name: Padrons Secret
type of rescue: Pierce County Animal Control seizure
intake date: 2/17/2012
adoption date: 6/18/2012
length of time with SAFE: 4 months

ADOPTED by Lorinda

In February 2012, SAFE was contacted by Pierce County Animal Control about 16 horses seized from an Arabian breeder the previous November. SAFE rallied to the call for help, agreeing to take five of the horses, including two stallions. What we did not know at the time was just how difficult those two stallions would prove to be. We made arrangements to transport them directly to Northwest Equine Stewardship Center (NWESC) where they could be safely housed until they were stable enough for gelding. Upon their arrival, however, Dr. Hannah Evergreen immediately determined gelding these two absolutely could not wait. They were extremely aggressive and “studish” towards humans and horses, having lived out their lives in extreme isolation and handled only for breeding. So much so that it was initially only safe for Dr. Hannah to handle them. Hannah personally handled their daily post‐gelding forced exercise and worked with them on basic ground manners.

SAFE takes the safety of our volunteers and potential adopters seriously. If we feel a horse is a danger to itself, other horses, or to people, we will opt to humanely euthanize the animal rather than risk injury. In this case, since Dr. Hannah felt confident handling Scooter and Oscar, we agreed to give Scooter and Oscar 30 days to see whether gelding them would turn them into manageable horses.

Scooter was a challenging case and his path to rehabilitation was not nearly as clearly defined as Oscar’s. Not only had his difficult behavior persisted, he wasn’t sound. Adding to that, his age (15), and lack of socialization made him a poor candidate as even a companion horse. We felt we were running out of options for Scooter and that a difficult decision might have to be made soon. The board discussed and debated how to move forward with Scooter. As rescuers, we face a lot of difficult decisions but the decision to let a horse go is, by far, the most difficult.

It was about this time that we received a phone call from NWESC. One of their volunteers had a friend with a lifetime of experience handling Arabians and Morgans, including difficult to handle stallions. Lorinda had heard about Scooter and wanted to meet him. After spending time handling him, Lorinda felt a great connection with this horse, who reminded her quite a lot of a stallion she trained in the past. Lorinda loves a challenge and she decided that she and Scooter could be a very good match. She came to us with several great ideas to combat his soundness issues and to establish his trust in order to improve his behavior. And best of all, Scooter seemed equally amenable to this new relationship, and responded very positively to Lorinda.

And so we began the adoption process, all the while marveling that we’d been so close to making the decision to euthanize this horse and now we were sending him off to a wonderful and safe new home. Lorinda was able to treat his soundness issues and give Scooter a future as a saddle horse.

SAFE Alum Scooter is Available for Adoption

SAFE Alum Scooter is Available for Adoption

Breed: Arabian
Color: Chestnut
Age: 23
Sex: Gelding
Height: 14.2hh
Registered Name: Padron’s Secret

If are looking for an easy going, loving, docile companion/light riding horse, check this guy out!

Pistol (known as Scooter at SAFE) was adopted from SAFE in 2012 but his current owner feels that there is a better situation out there for him. He is low man in every social situation and really would prefer to be turned out by himself or with someone like him that won’t take advantage of his mellow temperament. Pistol is happy to pack a rider once in awhile in exchange for lots of cookies after, but at 23 and with limited saddle experience, he doesn’t want to start a new career as a riding horse. Instead would much rather be doted on and allowed to be a beautiful pasture ornament. He is easy to care for, he loves kids, and doesn’t have any behavior issues or special care requirements. He should have access to a stall and be allowed to eat by himself.

Arabian enthusiasts will appreciate that Pistol is a son of the legendary Padron. He looks very much like his sire, and we’re told he has his good temperament as well. W

If you are interested in bringing SAFE Alumni Pistol into your herd, please contact Lorinda Blue at blueridgefarmtraining@gmail.com or 425.322.9300

For updates on many of your favorite adopted SAFE horses, visit our SAFE Alumni Facebook group! It’s where SAFE adopters can post updates, photos, and videos of their SAFE horses, to share their progress with the SAFE community!

Happy Trails, Scooter!

Happy Trails, Scooter!

Scooter Before

In February 2012, SAFE was contacted by Pierce County Animal Control about 16 horses seized from an Arabian breeder the previous November. SAFE rallied to the call for help, agreeing to take five of the horses, including two stallions. What we did not know at the time was just how difficult those two stallions would prove to be. We made arrangements to transport them directly to Northwest Equine Stewardship Center (NWESC) where they could be safely housed until they were stable enough for gelding. Upon their arrival, however, Dr. Hannah Evergreen immediately determined gelding these two absolutely could not wait. They were extremely aggressive and “studish” towards humans and horses, having lived out their lives in extreme isolation and handled only for breeding. So much so that it was initially only safe for Dr. Hannah to handle them. Hannah personally handled their daily post‐gelding forced exercise and worked with them on basic ground manners.

SAFE takes the safety of our volunteers and potential adopters seriously. If we feel a horse is a danger to itself, other horses, or to people, we will opt to humanely euthanize the animal rather than risk injury. In this case, since Dr. Hannah felt confident handling Scooter and Oscar, we agreed to give Scooter and Oscar 30 days to see whether gelding them would turn them into manageable horses.

We shared Oscar’s incredible turnaround in May. At the time, many of you asked about Scooter. We weren’t sure what to say because the truth was that Scooter was a more challenging case and his path to rehabilitation was not nearly as clearly defined. Not only had his difficult behavior persisted, he wasn’t sound. Adding to that, his age (15), and lack of socialization made him a poor candidate as a companion horse. We felt we were running out of options for Scooter and that a difficult decision might have to be made soon. The board discussed and debated how to move forward with Scooter. As rescuers, we face a lot of difficult decisions but the decision to let a horse go is, by far, the most difficult.

Scooter — Adopted!

It was about this time that we received a phone call from Lisa at NWESC. Their volunteer, Heather, had a friend with a lifetime of experience handling Arabians and Morgans, including difficult to handle stallions. Lorinda had heard about Scooter and wanted to meet him. After spending time handling him, Lorinda felt a great connection with this horse, who reminded her quite a lot of a stallion she trained in the past. Lorinda loves a challenge and she decided that she and Scooter could be a very good match. She came to us with several great ideas to combat his soundness issues and to establish his trust in order to improve his behavior. And best of all, Scooter seemed equally amenable to this new relationship, and responded very positively to Lorinda.

And so we began the adoption process, all the while marveling that we’d been so close to making the decision to euthanize this horse and now we were sending him off to a wonderful and safe new home. Lorinda has high hopes that she’ll be able to treat his soundness issues and give him a future as a saddle horse, but if that’s not possible, Scooter has a permanent place to live out his days on her beautiful farm.

We are so thankful for the amazing community of support we have, especially our partners at NWESC. The reality is that without their support horses like Scooter would be beyond our ability to help. So please join us in wishing “happy trails” to Scooter and Lorinda as well as our deepest gratitude to our friends at NWESC for facilitating the perfect match for a very difficult‐to‐place horse.

Hello Scooter!

Scooter is notorious for being not very nice when in his stall, but all I got greeted with was nice ears! He seemed curious and interested in me but did not come over to say hi.

Scooter & Oscar update

Former stallions Scooter and Oscar are both doing well and Dr Hannah feels like Oscar is ready to get his dental float and have his sarcoids removed, so he has an appointment scheduled for the 19th. Our plan is to send Oscar into training about a week after his sarcoids are removed.

Oscar did well having his feet trimmed today, he had a mare standing behind him and a horse in a stall in front of him. He didn’t “drop” at all which was great. He did give the “stink eye” a couple times, but nothing bad. Our farrier, Daphne, has mentioned she is willing to go up north to trim him next time to provide him some consistency while he is learning to respect people working on his feet.

Scooter was pretty good but not as good as Oscar. He did drop a few times and had to be backed up and reminded that was not appropriate (especially from our farrier’s perspective) He is not as far along as Oscar in his behavioral changes and will require some more time, hard work, and patience.

Oscar and Scooter update, updated!

Oscar and Scooter were taken straight to Evergreen Holistic Vet Care on Saturday to await their gelding surgeries. Both stallions have proven to be extremely difficult to handle and their surgeries were bumped up to this week to get them done as soon as possible. Oscar was castrated today and Scooter will be done later this week.

Photos below show Scooter during one of his short, supervised turnout sessions (during which he mostly paces and paws frantically). He may not be saying “Please hurry up and make me a gelding”, but we sure are! There is NOTHING worse than a unhandled, aged stallion. They are dangerous, and they are miserable. Scooter and Oscar were living in pens that hadn’t been opened in so long they had to cut the fences to get them out. We can only hope that they will settle down after the hormones are out of their system and with consistent handling.

Update 2/24/12 — Scooter has now joined the ranks of the geldings. He’s doing fine post surgery. (Photo added below)

Scooter — Impound Photos