Valor

SEX:
Gelding
BREED:
Quarter Horse
REGISTERED NAME:
TBD
 
COLOR:
Chestnut
MARKINGS:
Blaze, two hind socks
   
DOB:
Jan 19, 2014
AGE: 5 HEIGHT:
14.2

WEIGHT:

818 lbs

LOCATION:
Redmond
ADOPTION FEE:
$2,500
Online Adoption Application  

Valor’s Story

Valor and his five herdmates (including his dam, Nashville) were surrendered to SAFE by their owner, who was no longer physically or financially able to properly care for them. The horses were in decent weight but had not had farrier or dental care in some time. Valor came to SAFE as a stallion, but has been successfully gelded and is recovering well. He also had a hernia, that was surgically corrected and upward fixation of the patella, which has been treated with a fenestration process. Despite these medical needs, Valor is a fine young horse who is handsome, gentle, and bright.

Valor Today

Valor was started under saddle at SAFE through our volunteer Horsemanship Program. On the ground, he’s easy to be around, and he’s developed nicely under saddle at all three gaits with a big step and soft feel. He’s comfortable around other horses working in the arena and is generally unfazed by the noise and energy of what’s going around on him.

Regardless of the direction his adopter takes him in, Valor has a great mind, friendly personality, and lots of athletic potential. Not to mention he’s a handsome fellow with a shiny chestnut coat and a big white blaze!

Vibrant Valor and the Case of the Sticky Stifles

Vibrant Valor and the Case of the Sticky Stifles

(Valor photo by Sundee Rickey)

Unfortunately for Valor, his mother, Nashville, did not bless him with strong stifles. Since his arrival at SAFE we have worked to help cure him of his locking stifles (upward fixation of the patella), a condition that can cause a horse’s hind leg to appear to get stuck in place and unable to flex. He has gone through specific rehab programs designed to help him build up strength in his hind end in order to provide more support for his patellar ligaments, which often fixes this problem. We were doing pretty well with him until he had his setback with the minor trailer incident a few months back. Because he was on stall rest to allow his injuries to heal, he lost the muscling that he had built up in his hindquarters, and consequently began to have issues with his stifles locking up again.

Dr. Fleck of Rainland Farm Equine Clinic suggested we repeat the patellar ligament fenestration, the procedure that Valor had done in September 2017. We hauled him to the clinic for the procedure, which involves making multiple tiny cuts in the medial patellar ligament to encourage the growth of scar tissue. The scar tissue that forms is thick and tough, therefore helping to keep the patella in its normal position.

Dr. Fleck also recommended that we keep him turned out 24/7 to help encourage him to move around. His tendency to “lock up” occurred most often after he had been stalled overnight. Valor now lives outside next to his friends Moon and Cassidy, where he is quite happy.

Along with the weak stifles, Nashville also gave her son her flat feet and thin soles. He is currently being ridden in boots, but we will be putting him in a pair of metal shoes on his front feet. This is something that we were originally going to do last summer, but his hoof walls grew out enough that it became a non-issue for many months. But Valor is showing us once again that he really is just a guy that needs front shoes. Luckily that’s an easy problem to fix.

Today, Valor is going well under saddle once again. He barely missed a beat after this most recent rehab period, and he has a very positive attitude while he’s working. He is slowly regaining the strength in his hind end, and we’re optimistic that these sticky stifles are a thing of the past.

A Minor Setback for Valor

A few weeks ago, Valor had a stumble coming out of a horse trailer, scraping up both hind legs and lacerating his left front fetlock. The wounds on his hind legs were not the type that could be sutured but would require bandaging, but the fetlock laceration needed veterinary attention. It was a relatively small wound, but it was a flap that would heal best with sutures. Dr. Renner from Rainland came to the farm to treat him. His wounds were clipped and cleaned, then bandages applied to the hind legs and the front limb was sutured.

Following the laceration repair, Valor was prescribed antibiotics and three weeks of stall rest to allow the wounds to fully heal. His sutures were pulled and bandages changed last week. The fetlock wound looks perfect and the hind limb wounds are granulating in the way they should be. This boy’s sweet and calm nature shined through from the time he was injured to his final day of stall rest. He enjoyed being entertained by stall toys, but he never once put up a fuss and was a perfect gentleman even after being cooped up for three weeks!

New Video: Valor

Valor is coming along nicely. He is a big mover who will make someone a nice looking riding partner. As his training progresses, he is becoming responsive to the rider. This video is after working with Casey for 15 rides.  We are accepting applications and he is available to meet potential adopters. Email adopt@safehorses.org with questions and fill out an application before it’s too late!

Valor Meets a Potential Adopter

Valor Meets a Potential Adopter

Kasey O has been considering the adoption of a SAFE horse! She came out to meet Valor, and was kind enough to share her impressions of him:

About two weeks ago, I visited SAFE for a second time. The first time was to meet and ride Roscoe. This time was to meet Valor, and hopefully make a decision as to which of the two horses would make the perfect fit into our little family. I want to share my experience in viewing Valor.

First off, there is NO reason whatsoever I could come up with to turn this one away. He is wonderfully put together, his movement is nice, his attitude and demeanor is willing and pleasant. I don’t have as much insight as some more experienced riders may have, but I do consider myself an advanced rider in “ability to stay on and get by handling most horses of any level and able to get some good results in training” and I would say “intermediate” for being able to conform to certain disciplines or being able to know enough and handle myself well enough to learn a certain discipline, and “beginner” when it comes to refining what I am doing and “feeling” the horse and really “look like I kinda know what I am doing – sort of”.

My thoughts on Valor when considering him for someone like myself…One, time. He deserves time. Two, consistency. He deserves a consistent hand and consistent work. I felt if I was in a different place and time, he and I could have formed a great partnership as long as I participated in training with him, allowing us to learn and grow together. But let’s be real, I have two young sons. I have a limited amount of time to devote. I have some level of “knowledge” to contribute, and I’m ready to learn at a slower pace…but in being fair to Valor, I am not the right fit for him…at this time. But I tell you, were my boys a bit older already, I would have loved to bring Valor home. He is going to make an outstanding partner for someone and I would be thrilled to see him reach his potential. I felt in my heart, this boy was getting ready to go any of several directions with his right partner. And he sure is handsome.

I wish you the best, Valor, and I’m so happy you have ended up at SAFE, where they will make certain you remain SAFE for the rest of your life. You are a very lucky horse!!

Joel Conner Clinic Report: Valor

Joel Conner Clinic Report: Valor

SAFE volunteer Casey worked with Valor during the clinic, and had this to say about working with him:

I restarted Valor about a month ago and got to ride him in all three sessions of the Joel Conner clinic. He is such an easy horse to be around and a lot of fun to ride. He consistently moves up and down all three gaits off my seat and has started to pick up a soft feel. He is comfortable around other horses working in the arena and is generally unfazed by energy and noise happening around us. He is going to make someone a great partner!

Valor is Back on Track

Valor is Back on Track

Valor is now being ridden and worked by our experienced Horsemanship volunteer, Casey. She has ridden him a handful of times now and reports that he is sound and moving along well with the work. We would like to give Valor a few more weeks of regular rising before showing him to potential adopters but we are setting up visits with him now to any applicants that are interested.

Valor is a gentle boy with who does not have a mean bone in his body. He loves people and really enjoys working. Because he’s considered green broke, Valor is best suited for an experienced rider who can support him in his training along the way. This guy is worth it! He has a great mind, is athletic, and very personable. And he’s exceedingly handsome with his shiny chestnut coat and his big white blaze. He will make someone a wonderful partner and friend.

Checking in with Valor

Horsemanship Volunteer Kaya has been helping work with Valor. Here is what she had to say recently about this young gelding:

“Valor has been doing so great lately! He tries so hard and continues to help me learn this style of horsemanship by calling me out on my mistakes and “asking questions” that I don’t know the answers to. Aside from actually working, Valor is such a goofball! While we were working with the rope today, I threw it to the side of him and he walked over, picked up the loop in his mouth and looked at me. He has me cracking up constantly and he so cuddly, it’s hard to get things done sometimes! I’ve started calling him “puppy” because he acts just like one. Valor is one incredible horse and I feel very lucky to get to spend time with him. He’ll make someone a great friend some day!”

Valor is a Riding Horse!

Valor is a Riding Horse!

We are so pleased to announce that Valor is now officially a riding horse! Jolene did such a fantastic job preparing him for a rider that we decided we were comfortable doing the first rides here at Safe Harbor. She spent many hours “sacking him out” making sure there were no holes in the groundwork so that the first ride would be as smooth as possible. Here are a few photos and videos of the first two rides!!

Here is Valor’s 1st ride:

Here is Valor’s 2nd Ride:

New Glamor Shots: Valor

This boy is a rock star in the making! He has the looks, style, and swagger that will make anyone fall madly in love. He is going to be an amazing riding partner too!

Valor’s Strength Training

Valor’s rehabilitation is going super! The barn managers at SAFE began with walking him 2x a day, added ground poles and walking up hills. He then was able to graduate to roundpen work with Jolene to prepare him for saddling and ultimately to be ridden. As part of his rehab, along with the walk and trot work over cavallettis and walking up gradual inclines, Dr. Fleck said anything that would help him use his hind more to build up muscle would be great. We had the idea to teach him to pull a log and here is a video with the results. What a wonderful relaxed young boy he has become!

Valor: A Good Little Helper!

Valor was on site to help Caren with the installation of his new turnout slow feeder. He inspected the work and was very helpful in making sure everything was level. Many of the turnouts are now equipped with these wonderful boxes that keep the hay dry, limit waste, and allow the horses to have a more natural “grazing” feeding throughout the day. They are all loving the new feeders and are very thankful to the dedicated facilities team for coming up with these feeders and building them!

Health Update: Valor

Here is an update on Valor from our Herd Health Manager, Melinda:

At the end of September, Valor had his umbilical hernia repaired and at the same time had a medial patellar ligament fenestration, which is a surgical treatment for locking stifles. He was put on a rehab schedule that involved limited turnout with a regimented hand walking schedule. He was a gentleman for the trailer rides to and from the hospital and has been calm and well-behaved for his recovery process.

About a month later he began to have some stifle troubles again. One afternoon his right hind locked up and he couldn’t walk. Dr. Renner was called out from Rainland to help him out. As soon as it was unlocked, it went right back into the stuck position. It looked as though he may have needed another procedure done—but this time it would have been a patellar ligament desmotomy, in which the ligament is actually cut. Luckily, muscle relaxers helped Valor loosen up and his patella went back into place. Dr. Renner recommended we change up his rehab plan a little bit and add more protein to his diet to help him build more muscle to support those ligaments. Radiographs were taken to verify that there are no developmental changes going on his stifle joints that would cause this problem.

For now we are continuing with the extra protein, and are gradually building on the rehab work to help him build muscle. Jolene is the volunteer rider who is working with him. She will be adding saddle work and teaching him to pull something to build help with strength training. He occasionally gets a little “spicy” when he’s asked to trot, and he reminds us that he’s still only a three year old. Sometimes it’s easy to forget what a baby he is because he is such a mellow guy. It looks like Valor has a bright future ahead of him!

Valor Wears a Saddle!

Valor was on site to help Caren with the installation of his new turnout slow feeder. He inspected the work and was very helpful in making sure everything was level. Many of the turnouts are now equipped with these wonderful boxes that keep the hay dry, limit waste, and allow the horses to have a more natural “grazing” feeding throughout the day. They are all loving the new feeders and are very thankful to the dedicated facilities team for coming up with these feeders and building them!

End of Summer Photos with Valor

Six new horses to introduce

This boy is a rock star in the making! He has the looks, style, and swagger that will make anyone fall madly in love. He is going to be an amazing riding partner too!

safekeepers

Valor’s Friends:

1. Chris W.

2. Kimi W.

3. Annabel F.

4. _____________________

5. _____________________

6. _____________________

7. _____________________

8. _____________________

9. _____________________

10._____________________

Every horse deserves at least ten friends! Even a small monthly donation can make a difference. Plus, SAFE horse sponsors receive discounts at local businesses through the SAFEkeepers program!

Click here to sponsor Valor!